The use of tissue-engineered cellular constructs is currently under clinical evaluation for the surgical treatment of articular cartilage lesions in the knee. The primary failure mode in such cartilage repair techniques is related to fixation. In addition, the repair tissue is believed to be very fragile in the post-operative period, and unable to support the intra-articular loads. We have developed a laboratory testing protocol in order to quantify the contact pressure distribution that develops on fibrin glue grafts applied to full-thickness cartilage lesions. The contact pressure distribution has been mapped on the contact surface of specimens subject to compression, in three configurations (intact, defect and grafted), at increasing load levels. All the maps show stress concentrations at the rim of the defect and a more uniform stress distribution around the rim after defect grafting. At a contact load of 180 N, the peak contact pressure measured on cartilage is 2.5 MPa. In presence of the graft, the peak pressures on the cartilage area surrounding the defect are reduced by 16%, on average. In contrast, both the mean contact pressure on the graft and the graft's contact area increase. The graft was found to carry around 80% of the total applied contact load, at all load levels tested. Fibrin glue was chosen as a grafting material in our study because it shows material properties very representative of currently-implanted cellular constructs. Thus, the results of this study have quantified aspects of recipient graft sites that may assist in optimising such grafting procedures from a biomechanical point of view.

Contact pressures at grafted cartilage lesions in the knee

R. PIETRABISSA
2005

Abstract

The use of tissue-engineered cellular constructs is currently under clinical evaluation for the surgical treatment of articular cartilage lesions in the knee. The primary failure mode in such cartilage repair techniques is related to fixation. In addition, the repair tissue is believed to be very fragile in the post-operative period, and unable to support the intra-articular loads. We have developed a laboratory testing protocol in order to quantify the contact pressure distribution that develops on fibrin glue grafts applied to full-thickness cartilage lesions. The contact pressure distribution has been mapped on the contact surface of specimens subject to compression, in three configurations (intact, defect and grafted), at increasing load levels. All the maps show stress concentrations at the rim of the defect and a more uniform stress distribution around the rim after defect grafting. At a contact load of 180 N, the peak contact pressure measured on cartilage is 2.5 MPa. In presence of the graft, the peak pressures on the cartilage area surrounding the defect are reduced by 16%, on average. In contrast, both the mean contact pressure on the graft and the graft's contact area increase. The graft was found to carry around 80% of the total applied contact load, at all load levels tested. Fibrin glue was chosen as a grafting material in our study because it shows material properties very representative of currently-implanted cellular constructs. Thus, the results of this study have quantified aspects of recipient graft sites that may assist in optimising such grafting procedures from a biomechanical point of view.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12076/8833
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